cold waves
Jeunesse d’Ivoire, Italy, 1983
Tell me about the song you have on the compilation, what were the ideas behind it? 
Danilo Carnevale (guitar, electronics): As far as I’m concerned, it was all quite spontaneous, we were very young (late teens, early twenties), and instinct played a major role on what we were doing at the time. Still, what we were after was a pristine, minimal and spacious sound where all the elements could have room to breathe. We were aiming at moving people at different levels - emotional, aural and intellectual - without being overwhelming. Then, I guess we were making the most out of what were our possibilties, technique was far from being our interest: this was were our punk/new wave roots were showing. In a way it was a development of that scene and we were trying to stretch it as far as possible.

How do you feel about this music coming to prominence once again, 25 plus years after the event?  
DC: Mixed feelings, really. At first a great sense of being deprived of something. Regrets for a missed chance. I remember that at some point (around 1983?) our bass player replied to an advertisement he’d seen in NME and sent one of our early demotapes to this man, some Daniel Miller, who’d just started his small label. He replied saying the songs were interesting and if we’d like to send some more developed material. Little did we know that label was Mute records, and what would have become in the next few years! We thought we couldn’t trust some unknown person from a foreign country pretending to be a manager of an even more obscure little label. We were that stupid.
Patrizia Tranchina (vocals): I’m not surprised this happened. I’ve always believed in Jeunesse d’Ivoire’s potential, and this is a little revenge for the recognition we weren’t allowed at the time.
Jeunesse d’Ivoire’s track ‘A Gift Of Tears’ will appear on ‘Cold Waves and Minimal Electronics’, released 22nd Feb on Angular Records.

Jeunesse d’Ivoire, Italy, 1983

Tell me about the song you have on the compilation, what were the ideas behind it?

Danilo Carnevale (guitar, electronics): As far as I’m concerned, it was all quite spontaneous, we were very young (late teens, early twenties), and instinct played a major role on what we were doing at the time. Still, what we were after was a pristine, minimal and spacious sound where all the elements could have room to breathe. We were aiming at moving people at different levels - emotional, aural and intellectual - without being overwhelming. Then, I guess we were making the most out of what were our possibilties, technique was far from being our interest: this was were our punk/new wave roots were showing. In a way it was a development of that scene and we were trying to stretch it as far as possible.

How do you feel about this music coming to prominence once again, 25 plus years after the event?

DC: Mixed feelings, really. At first a great sense of being deprived of something. Regrets for a missed chance. I remember that at some point (around 1983?) our bass player replied to an advertisement he’d seen in NME and sent one of our early demotapes to this man, some Daniel Miller, who’d just started his small label. He replied saying the songs were interesting and if we’d like to send some more developed material. Little did we know that label was Mute records, and what would have become in the next few years! We thought we couldn’t trust some unknown person from a foreign country pretending to be a manager of an even more obscure little label. We were that stupid.

Patrizia Tranchina (vocals): I’m not surprised this happened. I’ve always believed in Jeunesse d’Ivoire’s potential, and this is a little revenge for the recognition we weren’t allowed at the time.

Jeunesse d’Ivoire’s track ‘A Gift Of Tears’ will appear on ‘Cold Waves and Minimal Electronics’, released 22nd Feb on Angular Records.